Coastal Research and Education Society of Long Island
Coastal Research and Education Society of Long Island
Coastal Research and Education Society of Long Island
Coastal Research and Education Society of Long Island
Coastal Research and Education Society of Long Island
Coastal Research and Education Society of Long Island
Coastal Research and Education Society of Long Island
Coastal Research and Education Society of Long Island
Coastal Research and Education Society of Long Island
Coastal Research and Education Society of Long Island
Coastal Research and Education Society of Long Island
Coastal Research and Education Society of Long Island
Coastal Research and Education Society of Long Island
Coastal Research and Education Society of Long Island

Documents

CRESLI Educator Material

 

Dear Educator/Science Coordinator:

The Coastal Research and Education Society of Long Island, Inc., (CRESLI) was founded in the summer of 1996 by a group of professionals and experts in marine mammal science, environmental sciences, education and conservation. CRESLI was formed for the purposes of conducting research, providing educational experiences and promoting conservation of coastal ecosystems.

CRESLI and the Viking Fleet (Montauk, NY) have joined forces to provide an array of unparalleled marine and coastal educational experiences for you and your students for. The cooperative association between CRESLI, with its expertise in marine sciences and education, and the Viking Fleet, with its large assortment of vessels and highly experienced crews, allows us to offer the following types of on-board educational experiences:

All cruises and excursions will be led by experienced CRESLI staff. In addition, CRESLI volunteers will be aboard to assist in our efforts. Educational material such as hand-outs and lab exercise can be provided prior to sailing dates. Speakers may also be provided, depending upon availability.

CRESLI also offers educational seal walks at Cupsogue Beach County Park in Westhampton Beach, NY.School groups can join CRESLI on public seal walks, or can arrange seprate walks for schools, or classes.  Contact Dr. Kopelman via email for more information

If you would like more information, please call CRESLI's voice mail (631-319-6003) and leave a message with your name and phone number.  You may also send an e-mail, by clicking here. Thank you for your time and consideration.

  • SCIENCE TEACHERSPlease note that CRESLI programs have been accredited by STANYS for in-service credit.  For more information, contact CRESLI.

Sincerely,

Arthur H. Kopelman, Ph.D.

President, CRESLI


CRESLI Educational Materials, Speakers, Library program, and Field Trips

Educators,  below is an annotated list of CRESLI material and programs that may be of interest to you. 

If you fill out and submit a request form, a sample packet of all materials will be mailed to you.

Materials available:

CRESLI Educational Brochures

Title:

Checklist of cetaceans, sea turtles, and coastal and pelagic birds of NY
Grade level: Middle School and above
Cost: Individual copy -  free; multiple copies - $5.00 for shipping and handling
Description: A tri-fold checklist of cetaceans, sea turtles, and coastal and pelagic birds of NY. 
Title: Common Marine Mammals and Sea Turtles of Long Island
Grade level: Middle School and above
Cost: Individual copy -  free; multiple copies -$ 5.00 for  shipping and handling
Description: Tri-fold brochure with details about the marine mammals and sea turtles of Long Island

 CRESLI Educator Request Form

Programs Available:

Title: Presentations
Grade level: any
Duration: varied
Cost: $200.00 honorarium
Description: CRESLI's professional educators and scientists are available to give lectures (with demonstration material) to groups of various sizes and ages at various venues.
Topics include (but are not limited to): Cetaceans of New York and Adjacent Waters; Pinnipeds of New York and Adjacent Waters;  Sea Turtles of New York; Birds of Coastal New York; Sharks of New York; Marine Ecology; Long Island's Natural History; Endangered Species; Climate Change; Stratospheric Ozone Depletion ...

Field Trips Available:

Whale watches

Title: Whale Watch (inshore) Whale Watch (offshore)
Grade level: any 4 and up
Duration: 5 hours 36 or 51 hours
Cost: $49 to $75  per individual depending upon age. Group discounts vailable to be determined
Description: Join LI's most experience whale researchers and catch a glimpse of our marine diversity just miles from our shore. Fin, minke, humpback, right, sperm, and pilot whales; dolphins, porpoises; sea turtles; pelagic birds can be seen. Whale watches take place from June through early September. Offshore overnight trips to the Great South Channel or the Canyons along the edge of the continental shelf to find Fin, minke, humpback, right, sperm, and pilot whales; dolphins, porpoises; sea turtles; pelagic birds.

Seal trips

Seal Walks

Title: Seal walks
Grade level: any
Duration: 1 to 3 hours
Cost: suggested donation of $5.00 per person over 18; $3 per those under 18
Description: Join CRESLI led walks to observe, count and photograph seals at haul out areas and learn about seal species diversity, ecology, evolution, and status.  Students will be involved in collecting seal density, distribution and behavior data. 
Seal Cruises
Title: Seal cruises
Grade level: any
Duration: 3-4 hours
Cost: to be determined
Description: Join CRESLI led cruises to observe seals at haul out areas on remote islands and learn about seal species diversity, ecology, evolution, and status.  Students will be involved in collecting seal density, distribution and behavior data. 
 
 

CRESLI Educator Request Form


 

CRESLI Research abstracts

Occurrence and distribution of large whales in the New York Bight: implications for marine spatial planning  
Ricardo Antunes, Arthur Kopelman, Paul Sieswerda, Robert DiGiovanni, Chris Spagnoli, Catherine Granton, Howard Rosenbaum 

  PRESENTED AT THE SOCIETY FOR MARINE MAMMALOGY 21ST BIENNIAL MEETING, SAN FRANCISCO, CA DECEMBER 2015

Large whales can be found year-round in the waters of the New York Bight, which is in the migratory pathways for several endangered and recovering species. Information on whale distribution and behavior in the New York Bight could be improved, and baseline and more in-depth information is needed for management and conservation planning, especially in the context of growing concerns about the impacts of ship strikes, entanglements and planning for offshore wind energy. Here we present 463 humpback and 1348 fin whale previously unpublished records, spanning between 1981 and 2014, collected from whale watching operations in the New York Bight. Sighting positions were used to model the spatial patterns of occurrence as a function of static (depth, distance from coast, distance from 200m isobath) and dynamic (Chlorophyll a concentration, sea surface temperature) environmental covariates, using boosted logistic regression trees. Modeled distribution for both species' was mostly explained by static variables with some contribution from surface temperature for humpback whales. Predicted humpback whale distribution was more coastal than for fin whales. To allow the spatially explicit assessment of the risks to whales from anthropogenic activities we overlaid the modeled whale species' distribution maps on the spatial distribution of potentially impacting anthropogenic activities such as shipping intensity, fisheries activity and renewable energy developments. An index combining the modeled whale spatial distribution and spatial distribution of anthropogenic activities was calculated and results are discussed in the context of marine spatial planning for the New York seascape.


The incidence of bent dorsal fins in free-ranging cetaceans

F. Alves, J. R. Towers, R. W. Baird, G. Bearzi, S. Bonizzoni, R. Ferreira, Z. Halicka, A. Alessandrini,1, A. H. Kopelman, C. Yzoard, M. H. Rasmussen, C. G. Bertulli, E. Jourdain, A. Gullan, D. Rocha, K. Hupman, M.-T. Mrusczok, F. I. P. Samarra, S. Magalhaes, C. R. Weir, J. K. B. Ford and A. Dinis 2017.  Journal of Anatomy.

 https://doi.org/10.1111/joa.12729

  Laterally bent dorsal fins are rarely observed in free-ranging populations of cetaceans, contrary to captivity, where most killer whale Orcinus orca adult males have laterally collapsed fins. This topic has been poorly explored, and data/information on its occurrence and possible causes are limited. The present study: (i) undertakes a review of the available information on bent dorsal fins in free-ranging cetaceans, and updates it with new records, (ii) reports on the proportion of bent fins in different study populations, and (iii) discusses possible causes. An empirical approach based on bibliographic research and compilation of 52 new records collected worldwide resulted in a total of 17 species of cetaceans displaying bent dorsal fins. The species with the highest number of records (64%) and from most locations was O. orca. On average, individuals with bent dorsal fins represent < 1% of their populations, with the exception of false killer whales Pseudorca crassidens and O. orca. While line injuries associated with fisheries interactions may be the main cause for P. crassidens, and the vulnerability to health issues caused by the evolutionary enlargement of the fin may be the cause for O. orca adult males, factors contributing to this abnormality for other species are still unclear. The occurrence of bent dorsals could be influenced by a set of variables rather than by a single factor but, irrespective of the cause, it is suggested that it does not directly affect the animals’ survivorship. While still rare in nature, this incident is more common (at least 101 known cases) and widespread (geographically and in species diversity) than hypothesized, and is not confined only to animals in captive environments. Investigation into the occurrence of bent fins may be an interesting avenue of research.


  Population identity and residency characteristics of humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) in the New York Bight apex

D.M. Brown1,2*, P.L. Sieswerda2, J. Robbins3, T. Boye4, L. Jones5, A. Kopelman6, M. Laurino7, S. Mallette8, M. Pepe9, C. Ramp10, and E.C.M. Parsons1

  1. Department of Environmental Science and Policy, George Mason University, 2300 University Drive, Fairfax, Virginia, 22030, U.S.A.
  2. Gotham Whale, 10 Bay Street Landing A5G, Staten Island, NY 10301, U.S.A.
  3. Center for Coastal Studies, 5 Holway Avenue, Provincetown, Massachusetts 02657, U.S.A
  4. Greenland Institute of Natural Resources
  5. Allied Whale
  6. Coastal Research and Education Society of Long Island
  7. Cape May Whale Watch and Research Center
  8. Virginia Aquarium and Marine Science Center
  9. Whale and Dolphin Conservation
  10. Mingan Island Cetacean Study

 *Corresponding author

 Abstract for World Marine Mammal Conference 2019

Cetacean research has historically been limited in the New York Bight apex (NYBA), which includes the Port of New York and New Jersey and adjacent waters. However, increased sightings, documented mortalities, and high levels of commercial and recreational activity suggest the need for a better understanding of humpback whales in this area. Opportunistic sightings and photo-identification data of 54 individuals identified from 2011-2016 were used to determine occupancy, occurrence, and annual return. Photographs were also shared with regional and basin-wide catalogs to determine the origins of these individuals and their exchange with other areas. Mean occupancy length in the NYBA was 30.5 days, mean occurrence was 2.3 days, and mean rate of return was 39.1%. Individuals sighted in the NYBA had histories in the greater New York Bight area (Cape May, NJ and Montauk, NY) and in the greater mid-Atlantic region (Virginia). There were also matches to primary feeding grounds, including 36% (n=18) to the Gulf of Maine and 2% (n=1) to Newfoundland. Sighting records suggest that most individuals were immature when seen in the NYBA. There is currently no evidence of within-year movement between the NYBA and primary feeding grounds. However, there were within-year sightings with both Montauk and Cape May suggesting that individuals may utilize the entire New York Bight during the feeding season. The NYBA may be of increasing importance to juvenile humpback whales as a supplementary feeding ground.


Distribution and occurrence of large whales in New York Bight prior to 2017: establishing baselines and informing management

Emily Chou1, Melinda L. Rekdahl1, Ricardo Antunes1, Christopher Spagnoli2, Artie H. Kopelman3, Paul L. Sieswerda4, Robert DiGiovanni5, Caroline Good6, and Howard C. Rosenbaum1

  1. Ocean Giants Program, Wildlife Conservation Society, Bronx, New York 10460 USA
  2. Conservation Innovation, Wildlife Conservation Society, Bronx, New York 10460 USA
  3. Coastal Research and Education Society of Long Island (CRESLI), West Sayville, New York 11796 USA
  4. Gotham Whale, Staten Island, New York 10301 USA
  5. Atlantic Marine Conservation Society, Hampton Bays, New York 11946 USA
  6. Duke University Marine Laboratory, Beaufort, North Carolina 28516 USA
Abstract for World Marine Mammal Conference 2019
 
The New York Bight is one of the busiest waterways in the world, where industries such as shipping, tourism, fishing and renewable energy development coincide with a diversity of marine wildlife. Large whales have been sighted with increasing frequency in recent years, yet detailed information on species distribution, required for effective management and planning, remains scarce. With growing conservation concerns, a synthesis of large whale sightings data from 1998 to 2017, including published and unpublished data, was conducted. MaxEnt species distribution models were constructed for two commonly sighted species: fin and humpback whales. A total of 211 fin and 228 humpback whale sightings were used in the analysis. Bathymetry, distance to shore, slope of the seafloor, sea surface temperature, chlorophyll-a concentration and zooplankton biomass were included as covariates. Zooplankton data, a proxy for foraging potential, were only available for waters within the 1000m isobath, thus two models were run for each species: the first included all covariates for waters less than 1000m; the second included all covariates except the zooplankton data for the entire study extent. Areas with high probability of presence were largely coastal in both fin whale models, with low probability of presence past 1000m. Humpback whale models identified high probability of presence near New York Harbor and areas along the 1000m isobath. Distance to shore and chlorophyll-a concentration contributed most to fin and humpback whale models, respectively. Inclusion of zooplankton data appeared to influence the probable distribution of both species as a result of patches of relatively high zooplankton biomass. Results also highlighted areas of anthropogenic overlap with whale occurrence, including potential offshore wind energy areas. These results provide valuable baselines to inform future research and monitoring efforts, and the development of best management mitigation practices that may minimize impacts to whales in the New York Bight. 

 
Geospatial Analysis of Cetacean Distribution and Habitat Utilization Related to Prey Density and Sea-Surface Temperature off the Long Island, New York Coastline by Jared Bergen (Sayville High School)

2016 1st Place Intel Long Island Science & Engineering Fair (LISEF) Round 2

 Knowledge concerning the distribution of cetaceans in the northeast Atlantic Ocean is limited; information pertaining to cetacean population patterns over time off the coastline of Long Island is even less well understood. Geospatial analysis of data compiled by the Coastal Research and Education Society of Long Island (CRESLI) beginning in the 1980s through the present may prove useful in providing a clear picture of general population and distribution trends over time. The dissemination of information regarding how and why cetaceans utilize their offshore Long Island habitat is much needed as various environmental management issues emerge, such as an Alternative Energy Management Plan for offshore wind turbines that has recently begun its first stages of construction, along with entanglement and boat strikes which are common further north and west of this study location.  CRESLI data, for the years 1989-1995, 1997-2000, and 2009-2015 was used for this study and analyzed geospatially using  ESRI®’s ArcMAP Version 10.3 and spatial statistics tools for cetacean count, sea-surface temperature, prey density, and observation of calves over time.  The observations were for a cruise track area of approximately 300 square miles located south of Montauk Point, Long Island, New York. The data were transcribed from ship logs into Excel, added to ArcMap as X-Y data, and projected to NAD83 UTM Zone 18N. Geographic distributions were analyzed using spatial statistics tools including mean center and standard deviational ellipses to determine where cetaceans and prey shifted annually and how those features were oriented over the study period.  Patterns were identified using the average nearest neighbor and Ripley’s K-function to establish whether the cetacean counts and prey density were clustered or dispersed.  Additionally an optimized hot spot analysis was conducted to identify whether hot spots for high cetacean counts overlay hot spots for high prey density over time.  A multivariate grouping analysis was conducted to determine which feature was a statistically significant factor for cetacean count by cluster. The results suggest that cetacean clusters have shifted annually, are oriented southwest-northeast, and that both cetacean counts and prey density by location are clustered and do not occur by chance.  Calves are associated with high prey density hot spots. Some clusters of cetacean counts by region are more influenced by sea-surface temperature, while others are more influenced by prey density and sea-surface temperature combined.  Over 260 cetaceans have been observed utilizing the habitat within the Deepwater Wind energy location off of Block Island. These results are important to better understand where cetaceans utilize habitat for foraging as adults and with calves throughout the New York region and how they are connected to the Gulf of Maine stock as 14 adults and 2 claves from that group have been confirmed in this study location. As 3/13 great whale species in this group are classified as endangered/ vulnerable, it is important to understand their distribution to best protect their habitat range and migratory corridors in the future


Kopelman, A. H.  and S. S. Sadove.  1995.  Ventilatory rate differences between surface-feeding and non-surface feeding fin whales (Balaenoptera physalus) in the waters off eastern Long Island, New York, USA, 1981-87.  Marine Mammal Science 11(2):200-208.

Observations of feeding and ventilatory behavior of individual fin whales (Balaenoptera physalus) were made from various vessels during the months of May - September, 1981-87, in the waters off eastern Long Island, N.Y., U.S.A..  Intervals between blows were measured and recorded to the nearest second.  Information about behavior was recorded, as were location, depth, and surface temperature at sounding dives.  Animals observed feeding at the surface were noted as such, all others were considered non-surface feeding.  Data were compiled by individual, month, year, and analyzed for mean interblow interval during surface activity bouts; mean dive duration; and overall mean blow interval.

Overall mean blow intervals (± s.e.) of 47.89 ± 0.81s for feeding (n = 10411), and 57.92 ± 0.97s for non-surface feeding animals (n = 11024), differed significantly (Mann-Whitney U, p < .001).  Interblow intervals for surface activity bouts (± s.e.) of 12.29 ± 0.05s for feeding (n = 7894), and 13.58 ± 0.06s, for non-surface feeding animals (n = 8187), also differed significantly (Mann-Whitney U, p < .001), as did mean dive duration (159.53 ± 2.16s, n = 2517, for feeding animals; 185.86 ± 2.53s, n = 2837, for non-surface feeding animals).  Yearly comparisons of blow intervals between feeding and non-surface feeding animals during surface activity bouts yielded significant differences for each year except 1981, while comparisons of dive durations yielded significant differences for all years except 1981, 1982, and 1985. 


RESIDENCY PATTERNS FOR FIN WHALES (Balaenoptera physalus) OFF LONG ISLAND, NEW YORK.
Long, J. A.1 , Gorgone A. M. 2,  Sadove, S. S. 3, Forestell, P. H. 4,  Kopelman, A.H. 5

(1, 2, 4) Long Island University, Southampton College, (3, 5) Coastal Research and Education Society of Long Island, Inc.

Surveys of fin whales, (Balaenoptera physalus) were conducted during the months of May through September, from 1979 through 1996, off Long Island, New York. Surveys primarily occurred aboard whale watching vessels. When possible, individual identification photographs were collected on the cruises. Photographs from 1981 through 1988 were compared for matches of individuals based upon the technique described by Agler et al. All identification type photographs were entered into a computer database to facilitate a more rapid matching of individuals. Animals were keyed into the database based upon dorsal fin type, chevron, and/or nicks and scars. Initial matching was based upon these features. Final matches were made by manually examining each slide and matching at least 5 major features for each whale.

Individual fin whales were found to occupy the region on a recurring basis over numerous years. In some instances occupancy was repetitive on an annual basis, while in other instances gaps of one or more years occurred. Individual fin whales were found to occupy the region for a period of up to 9 weeks, however, many animals were not photographed on a continuous or daily basis. This may not be indicative of movement from the area as surveys throughout the entire occupancy area were often not possible aboard the platform vessel. Residency diagrams presented with this study demonstrated a clear preference to return to the region over a period of years.

In 1987, a very large number of new animals were seen in the area, as some of the largest numbers of whales found in the region were observed. In our analysis, this year had to be considered anomalous based upon the extremely large number of whales found in the region. The large number of whales seen has not been repeated since that time.

The resighting rate indicates that a significant number of animals seen annually in the region were previously sighted individuals. Based upon the high resighting rate and the long term annual recurrence of individual fin whales, this area may be a significant seasonal residency site. However, animals were not always seen in the same areas either within one year or over a period of years. Resightings of whales indicate a use of the whole area and not a specific trend to one site. Consequently, movement throughout the area would be expected based upon our analysis


 ADDITIONAL 

Edwards EF, Hall C, Moore TJ, Sheredy C and Redfern JV (2015). Global distribution of fin whales (Balaenoptera physalus) in the post-whaling era (1980-2012). Mammal Review Volume 45, Issue 4, pages 197-214. 

ASSESSING THE APPLICABILITY OF COMPUER AIDED PHOTO-IDENTIFICATION FOR PINNIPED STUDIES THROUGH THE DETERMINATION OF SITE FIDELITY IN LONG ISLAND, NY HARBOR SEALS (PHOCA VITULINA CONCOLOR)

MEAGHAN MCCORMACK:  A THESIS SUBMITTED TO THE FACULTY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF SCIENCE CORAL GABLES, FLORIDA MAY 2015
 

CRESLI's past trips: 2013 through 2018

 

CRESLI/Viking Fleet Whale Watch Sightings

2013-2018

Sunday July 1, 2018

Wow! What a way to start the season! Dolphins and Whales

Our first trip was a success. We had reports and coordinates for hundreds of dolphins and a minke whales sighted this morning and a humpback sighted yesterday. Off we went to find them and we did. The minke was “stinky minke” seen by just a few people. As we continued searching, we found a large aggregation of about 100 short-beaked common dolphins. The aggregation included adults, juveniles, and calves. 

We left the dolphins and headed towards the coordinates for the humpback. We found it about an hour later. Its dorsal fin was partially gone probably due to an entanglement. It was diving often and searching for food. We stayed in the area and the whale consistently came up ¼ to ½ half mile away. Fluke shots were taken for identification and it was a eventually time to leave. We got back to the dock late but everyone was exhilarated and everyone had a wonderful afternoon.


Totals:
~100 short-beaked common dolphins
1 Minke Whale
1 humpback whale
8-10 Great Shearwaters
15-20 Cory’s Shearwaters
 
5-10 Sooty Shearwaters
25-30 Wilson’s Storm Petrels
10 Manx Shearwaters

PHOTOS

Sunday July 8, 2018

3 Species of Whale, 1 Species of Dolphin, and 11 species of Pelagic and Coastal Birds!


What an amazing day on the water. We had reports of whales from Saturday, but we had friends out there and said there weren’t seeing anything. With no information except our 30 year knowledge of whale feeding areas near Montauk, Captain Dave Marmino and Naturalist Dr. Artie Kopelman formulated a plan and headed to an area that has almost always has been productive. Within an hour of passing Montauk Light, we had our first minke whale. Like other minkes, this one was elusive. As we were waiting for the minke to resurface, we saw the blows from a larger whale about 1.5 nautical miles (nm) away. Off we headed to find our second species - humpback whale. The humpback breached about 1 nm ahead of us, we were able to stay with this whale for 40 minutes as it circled, traveled, and dove over a 3.5 nm path . We got great views of the ID patterns on the ventral side of the flukes. From this point we saw the massive blows of a fin whale ½ nm away (our 3rd baleen whale species)! The fin whale was only about 50’ long and had easily seen entanglement scars on its right flank and harder to see shallow propeller scars on its back just in front of its dorsal fin. About ½ mile from the fin whales we saw an aggregation of about 60 short-beaked common dolphins and spent the next 20 mi9nutes being amazed by the dolphins as they rode our bow and swam and porpoised all around. What a day!

Totals:
1 minke whale
1 humpback whale
1 finback whale
60 short-beaked common dolphins
98 Cory's Shearwater
53 Great Shearwater
14 Sooty Shearwater
4 Manx Shearwater
148 Wilson's Storm-Petrel
1 Northern Gannet
8 Double-crested Cormorant
7 Laughing Gull
130 Herring Gull
121 Great Black-backed Gull
Bird totals thanks to Taylor Sturm

PHOTOS

Wednesday July 11, 2018

2 Species of Whale and 5 species of Pelagic Birds!


2018 is starting out right where we left off in 2017, with 100% success in finding whales! A beautiful, yet cool and windy day, with a large swell from a distant ofshore storm, gave us a day with good visibility and really 'tricky' whales. 

We had reports of whales to the east of Block Island, too far for us to do anything but drive out, look for 30 minutes, and drive back.  on our way to Sunday's whales grounds, we got a report of several whales south of Block Island, only about 7 miles from where we were on Sunday.  Off we went. Our first two whales were "stinky" minkes, with just a few of us seeing the whales and their dive times were VERY long. Luckily we saw two whales about 1.5 miles ahead of us, one with characterstic massive finback whale blow, the other was less prominent. We found a large fin whale and a minke feeding in this area several miles south of the Deep Water wind farm. The whales, pelagic birds, and coastal birds were feeding on large quantities of prey from the surface to about 50 feet down.  The whale down times were long, but we did manage to get good photos of the fin whale.

Totals:
3 minke whales
1 finback whale
~65 Wilson's Storm-Petrels
~60 Cory's Shearwaters 
several Scopoli's Shearwaters
~30 Great Shearwaters
4 Sooty Shearwaters
1 Manx Shearwater

PHOTOS

Sunday July 15, 2018

A trip for the ages! 18-20 Humpbacks and 8 fin whales feeding voraciously!

We had reports of whales feeding not far from Montauk Point, so we headed to the area we were in the reports. Less that an hour from the dock we found our first of nearly 30 whales!! Humpbacks and finback were feeding on massive quantities of sand eels. We’re used to seeing bubble feeding humbacks on our trips to the Great South Channel, not necessarily near Montauk, but there they were. In fact, many of the humpbacks were photographed are know members of the Gulf of Maine stock – and obviously aren’t in the GOM. We saw bubble rings, bubble mists, Kick-feeding, and open-mouth surface filtering humpbacks galore. There were breaching and flipper slapping humpbacks too. The fin whales were surface lunging and rolling sideways into concentrations of prey right at the surface. We were surrounded by whales feeding non-stop for 2 hours. An amazing trip!

Totals
18-20 humpback whales
8 finback whales
~100 Wilson’s Storm petrels
~30 Sooty shearwaters
~150 Cory’s shearwaters
~80 Great shearwaters
2 Manx shearwaters


PHOTOS

Wednesday July 18, 2018

Whales, whales, and more whales!

We returned to the area where we found the whales feeding on sand eels on 7/15/18 and the whales, sand eels, and pelagic birds were still there, with new additions! We found 2 minke whales, 4 finback whales, and about 15-20 humpback whales again, feeding voraciously on sand eels. Some of the humpbacks from Sunday were still there including Columbia, Dome, and Reaper, and they were joined by many new ones including W, a whale known to spend sometimes part of the summer in the Bay of Fundy. Why go to Fundy when you can hang out near Montauk and feed-up on tons of sand eels. In our last 2 trips we've photographed 19 different humpbacks including: Columbia Combat Coral Dome Ganesh Reaper W!

Totals
15-20 humpback whales
4 finback whales
2 minke whales
>100 Sooty shearwaters
>100 Cory’s shearwaters
>100 Great shearwaters

In our last 2 trips we've photographed 19 different humpbacks 
including:
Columbia
Combat
Coral
Dome
Ganesh
Glo-Stick
Jigsaw
Multiply
Reaper
Reflection
W


PHOTOS

Wednesday, July 25, 2018

More humpback whales!

It had been a week since we were out last. We wondered whether the stormy weather had affected the prey distribution and whales, but had reports of whales, and Capt. David Marmino had seen whales earlier in the day while fishing. We headed out, and chose a path that would provide the most comfortable conditions when we reached the whale grounds. It was a bouncy ride out, but well worth the effort. It took a few hours of travelling and searching and we found humpback whales again near where we had seen them a few weeks ago. Although we saw blows from about 6 whales, only 2 were close enough to identify – these were whales we had never seen before: an unnamed calf of Photon; and Nile, a grand old dame of the Gulf of Maine Stock of humpbacks. Nile was first seen 31 years ago, and had been seen 5 days earlier on the southern edge of Stellwagen Bank National marine Sanctuary(Massachusetts), 170 miles away swimming around the Cape and Nantucket (34 miles per day). Wow.

Totals:
6 humpback whales
including:
Nile
Unnamed calf of Photon

~200 Cory’s Shearwaters
~80 Great Shearwaters
~50 Sooty Shearwaters
~20 Wilson’s Storm Petrels

PHOTOS

Sunday, July 29, 2018

4 Cetacean species day!

Well we found them again. Finback whales, minke whales, humpback whales, and short-beaked common dolphins. The whales weren’t particularly “cooperative,” spending long times down feeding near the sea floor, but they are there to feed. We found 5 finback whales including 2 mom/calf pairs, 5 humpbacks, 2 minkes whales, and about 150 dolphins. The dolphin rode our bow wake and rode the bow wakes of some of the fin whales. Birders on board were happy to find loads of pelagic birds too.

Totals:
5 finback whale
5 humpback whales
2 minke whales
150 short-beaked common dolphins
125 Cory’s shearwaters 
40 Great shearwaters 
5 Sooty shearwaters 
4 Manx shearwaters 
7 Parasitic jaegers
1 immature Northern gannet


PHOTOS

Wednesday, August 01, 2018

5 species of dolphins and whales!

Another successful Viking Fleet/CRESLI whale watch on the Viking Starship! This time, we were able to find finback whales, minke whales, and humpback whales, as well as bottlenose dolphins and short-beaked common dolphins – 5 different species! The whales were spending long times down feeding near the bottom, the action of the dolphins made up for the relatively uninteresting whale behavior. Porpoising, bow riding, and high jumping happened in the bottlenose dolphins that started our day about ½ hour after passing Montauk Lighthouse. Whales and dolphins kept up busy for the next 3 hours, non-stop, ending with a massive aggregation of common dolphins. Another wonderful trip.

Totals:
2 finback whale
3 humpback whales
3 minke whales
150 Bottlenose dolphins
100 short-beaked common dolphins
75 Cory’s shearwaters 
25 Great shearwaters
2 Manx shearwaters 
1 Parasitic jaeger


PHOTOS

Sunday August 5, 2018

Finback whales and Minke whales

We headed out to check for whales where we’d been seeing them for the past few weeks. It was wonderful to get offshore and away from the heat, and even more wonderful when we found our first of 5 finback whales and 3 minke whales. We found the whales feeding on sand eels near the sea floor and as the sand eels rose in the water column to great densities we found more whales. Ultimately 3 singleton fin whales (40, 60, and 75 feet long, respectively) and one mom/calf pair. Intersperse among these larger baleen whales we found 3 minke whales. We headed back in to search for dolphins that were seen earlier but they were not found. All-in-all a great trip!

Totals
5 finback whales (including 1 mom/calf pair)
2 minke whales
16 Cory’s Shearwater
27 Great Shearwater
1 Sooty Shearwater
12 Double-crested Cormorant
2 Parasitic Jaeger
11 Laughing Gull
42 Herring Gull
25 Great Black-backed Gull
7 Least Tern
122 Common Tern
5 Royal Tern
1 Fish Crow
Bird Count via Arie Gilbert

PHOTOS

Wednesday August 8, 2018


7 humpbacks and 1 fin whale!

We found whales again. As usual, when it’s warm on land, we were glad to get offshore, but it was still pretty warm. We didn’t have to go far to find our first whales – 2 humpbacks, a mom and her calf. The mom had been seen by us 1 month earlier about 7 nm further east. She and her calf were our first of 7 humpbacks for the day. These whales were thin and feeding, a must for them this time of year. The calf showed signs of having been entangled, but no gear could be seen, so the calf had also been freed of its entanglement. We continued to find humpbacks whales throughout the trip, including several that were also relatively thin. We got ID photos from most (underside of flukes) and are checking against our catalog for LI, as well as others from NYC, the Gulf of Maine, and Mid-Atlantic. We found an incredibly rare Kemp’s Ridley sea turtle and heard about whales east of our location and headed there to find more humpbacks and a young finback whale. While there, we heard of dolphins in Fort Pond Bay and decided to head in to look for them. We didn’t find the dolphins, but found lots of bait and birds (terns, gulls, and shearwaters). Another amazing trip!

Totals
7 humpback whales
1 finback whale
1 Kemp’s Ridley sea turtle
35 Cory’s shearwaters
5 Great shearwaters
1 Sooty shearwater
1 Manx shearwater
1 Parasitic jaeger
10 Semipalmated plovers


PHOTOS

Wednesday August 15, 2018


3 species of whales again!!

We had some reports of whales and headed towards those coordinates, but didn’t find them. Off we went to the areas where we have been successful on previous trips, and once again found whales. A mom and calf fin whale – were amazing to watch. Their grace and beauty were evident and we were privileged to watch the calf nursing. What a beautiful thing to observe. We found a minke whale out here as well.It was eventually time to head back, but we were stopped I our tracks by a small humpback. Shortly thereafter we found a trio of fin whales exactly where we had been searching hours earlier. What an amazing day on the water.

Totals
5 fin whales
1 humpback whale
1 minke whale
15 Great Shearwaters
5 Cory’s Shearwaters
2 Sooty Shearwaters
1 Max Shearwater
1 Wilson’s Storm Petrel

PHOTOS

Wednesday August 22, 2018

 

Crazy Breaching Young Humpback

Our streak of successfully finding whales continues (12 consecutive trips in 2018, 8 in 2017); 122 out of 132 trips since 2009 (92.42%). This trip brought us westward and we found a young humpback breaching like crazy. From afar, we saw 5 breaches - later when nearer this whale, but still about 400 yards away, we watched it breach 18 consecutive times within a 3 minute period. Two whales had been seen in this area for the prior 2 days. Could this young whale wave been using the sounds produced by breaching to send a non-vocal signal to the other? Probably. We stayed with this whale as long as we could, then searched for others to no avail. Still, it was a spectacular trip.

Totals:
1 humpback whale
10 Great Shearwaters
2 Cory's Shearwaters


PHOTOS

Sunday August 26, 2018

Humpbacks, fin whales, and minke whales again

Our 21st consecutive trip with whales started with a breaching humpback near Montauk. This young humpback, like so many others showed signs of entaglement. We headed to another area (about 11 nm out) where we found 2 whales that we believe were fin whales, but couldn't get good enough views to confirm absolutely. On our way back in, we found another breaching, flipper slapping humpback and a minke whale.

Totals
2 humpbacks
2 fin whales
1 minke whale
12 Cory's Shearwaters
1 Scopoli's Shearwater
4 Great Shearwaters


PHOTOS

Wednesday August 29, 2018

Whales throughout the day!

We had another spectacular day. We began the trip by surveying an area SW of Montauk where whales have been consistently spotted. The day started slowly until we spotted several huge bait balls of small fish at the surface. We immediately spotted several minke whales. Typically for minkes they would briefly surface than disappear. A good sized hammerhead shark cruised within an arms length of the boat to the excitement of some of our younger passengers. We saw a few blows in the area and soon a large fin whale crossed directly in front of our bow and treated us to a thrilling view. The activity picked up as several humpback whales of various ages were also feeding in the area and we spent considerable time with them. As we started to return to Montauk we had to stop again as we were treated to 3 humpback whales breaching repeatedly. We finally had to say goodbye and returned to the dock a bit late – Not that any of the happy passengers minded!

TOTALS
6 Minke Whales
1 Fin Whale
5 Humpback Whales
1 Hammerhead Shark
3 Cory's Shearwaters


PHOTOS

Sunday September 2, 2018


2 whales, 2 different species!


We had perfect conditions, unlimited visibility, 2 feet seas, and clear skies. We headed towards whales had been seen earlier, but saw none. We headed through the areas where we had been seeing whales all summer and saw none, unfortunately. We began to turn towards Montauk and a minke whale popped up right in front of us. It surfaced a bunch of times and allowed many people to view it, albeit briefly. We continued back towards Montauk and at 6:30, we saw the high billowing blow of a larger whale. We found a 1.5-2-year old humpback that we had seen on 8/8/18 (nearly 1 month earlier and about 5 nautical miles SSW), Scylla’s 2016 calf. We spent a while with this whale, but had to leave – we were late enough as is. On our way back to the dock we were able to see a beautiful sunset. Another successful trip.

Totals
1 minke whale
1 humpback whale
8 Cory’s shearwaters
2 Scopoli’s shearwaters
1 hammerhead shark


PHOTOS

Sunday July 2, 2017

Wow! What a way to start the season!

Things started slowly, with little action until we saw the Ocean Sunfish. Shortly thereafter, we began to see large numbers of shearwaters and petrels and we got a report of whales just 1.5 miles directly ahead of us. We found 5 fin whales there, spreadout over a half a mile, including a mom and calf (our first whales) and 3 others. There was bait on the water from 50-170 feet down. We began to head home and found 3 more fin whales and 1 minke whale. It was an incredible first trip! A perfect day!

Totals:
8 Fin Whales
1 Minke Whale
1 Ocean Sunfish
1 Blue Shark
46 Great Shearwaters
80 Cory’s Shearwaters
25 Sooty Shearwaters
120 Wilson’s Storm Petrels
4 Manx Shearwaters
1 South Polar Skua
1 Black Tern


Bird counts thanks to Anthony Collerton 
PHOTOS

July 9, 2017

Whales, dolphins, sunfish, and a sea turtle. What a day we had! An amazing trip-even better than last week's.

We saw 11 fin whales, 500 dolphins, a loggerhead turtle and lots of action and pelagic birds. We were headed to a spot around 15 nautical miles away but began to find whales closer. Our first whales were a cow/calf pair with the calf logging (sleeping) at the surface and the mother was searching for food. This pair we had seen a week earlier 10 miles to the southwest. The calf was logging (sleeping) just under the surface. After a while with them, we headed further out and found another cow/calf pair that were staying close to each other as we would expect because the calf was small and young, diving together, swimming together. The calf decided to come close and roll over next to us and swim across our bow twice. Mom decided to swim between us and the calf, the calf swam around mom and moved next to us again. We left them to find yet another cow/calf pair and then several other singleton fin whales. These whales were joined with 500 short-beaked common dolphins. All were feeding . One fin whale came up and did a sideways surface feeding lunge. We found and stayed with another cow/calf pair until it was time to head back even though we were surrounded by fin whales in all directions all around us. Everyone had a great day!

Totals:
11 Fin Whales
500 Short Beaked common dolphins
1 Loggerhead turtles
1 Ocean sunfish
300 Great shearwaters
300 Cory’s shearwaters
10 Sooty shearwaters
1 Manx shearwaters
100 Wilson’s storm petrels


Bird counts thanks to Arie Gilbert and Pat Aitken

PHOTOS and VIDEO

July 16, 2017

Humpbacks, bottlenose dolphins, fin whale, and more!

Another great whale watch trip! We started the day with a plan to head about 15 nautical miles from Montauk, where whales had been seen the day before. As we passed Montauk Lighthouse we received a report of dolphins and a whale about 3 miles from where we were. So, we headed there and a few miles later found our first humpback of the 2017 season, a young and active whale. There were about 200 inshore bottlenose dolphins, including many young ones swimming and feeding in the same area. This young whale surprised us all by doing a beautiful full body rotating breach. After 40 minutes and 4 miles with these animals, we headed further offshore to find more whales. Six miles later we found another young humpback, and 15 miles after that, a massive finback whale. Throughout the trip we encountered various fish, from an ocean sunfish to a hammerhead shark. We also found quite a lot of pelagic birds.

Totals:
2 Humpback whales
1 Fin whale
1 Ocean sunfish
1 Hammerhead shark
200 Bottlenose dolphins (inshore population)
15 Cory's shearwaters
10 Great shearwaters
1 Sooty shearwater
300 Wilson's storm petrels
1 Northern Gannet (immature)


PHOTOS

July 23, 2017

4 Humpbacks! We are still at 100% success for 2017!

We didn’t have to go far to find our first whale- right at the edge of town, shortly after turning west at the Lighthouse. It was a large, active humpback. Tail throws, flipper slapping and rolling over tail throws! There was lots of action as it fed on some bunker. Bunker was everywhere and we found 3 other humpback whales over the course of the next few hours from Gurneys to miles off of Ditch Plains. Our last humpback whale was one we had seen 6 nautical miles further south one week earlier. There were more humpbacks seen breaching off in the distance, but we we were unable to spend the time getting to them, There's always next week. 

Totals:
4 Humpbacks
10 Wilson’s Storm Petrels
20 Cory’s Shearwaters
1 Great Shearwater


PHOTOS

August 06, 2017

15 Humpbacks!! 100 Bottlenose Dolphins……


Our streak of finding whales continues. This time, within 40 minutes of leaving the dock and about 10 minutes past Montauk Lighthouse we found the first of our 15 humpbacks! There was bait all over – mackerel, sand eels, and bunker. The first few whales were feeding on sand eels. The last were feeding on bunker. Single whales and mom/calf pairs were seen. Humpbacks breaching, tail throws, and flipper slaps happened. Oh, and loads of bottlenose dolphins too. It was an amazing day with non-stop whales for over 4 hours.

Totals:
15 Humpback Whales
100 Inshore Bottlenose Dolphins
5 Cory’s Shearwaters
2 Wilson’s Storm Petrels
1 Mako shark

PHOTOS

VIDEO

August 13, 2017

Can we find whales in the fog? YES WE CAN!


The trip started out with clear skies and full visibility until some patchy fog rolled in. We had repeats of whales and when we got to the area, the fog lifted and we found our first humpback. Our second humpback showed up next to us as we travelled through foggy areas. We saw one farther off fin slapping, but lost that one in the fog as the near one lured for bunker. Our third humpback also feeding on bunker. When the fog had finally cleared we were able to watch it for a while as it selected dense large bunker patches and avoided smaller ones. A spectacular day again!

Totals:
3 Humpback Whales
22 Great Shearwaters
76 Cory’s Shearwaters
153 Wilson’s Storm Petrels
Bird counts courtesy of Taylor Sturm and Pete Morris

PHOTOS

August 20, 2017

We found whales again! Whales and a turtle.


Shortly after passing the Lighthouse we found our first whale, a young humpback that we hadn't seen before. It stayed near us feeding for some time, totally ignoring our presence. It breached once surprising everyone pleasantly. After a while we left to find others. Our second whale was seen from a mile away breaching and flipper slapping. This one was also new to us. It stopped breaching and began logging (a resting behavior) for quite some time. We eventually left to look for others offshore. Before we left we found a loggerhead turtle. Around 2pm we headed back to the earlier area and found a third humpback also new, and older/larger than the rest. While with this humpback, a minke whale surfaced. It was time to leave, but what a great trip!

Totals:
3 Humpback Whales
1 Minke whale
1 Loggerhead sea turtle
1 Manx Shearwater
5 Great Shearwaters
3 Cory’s Shearwaters
5 Wilson’s Storm Petrels

PHOTOS

August 27, 2017

Mom and calf humpbacks!


A gorgeous day on the water was made even better by finding 3 humpbacks and spending time with 2 of the 3, a mom/calf pair, identified by Dr. Artie Kopelman as Manhattan and her 2017 calf. We first met Manhattan 10 years ago in the Great South Channelas the 2007 calf of Appaloosa. We saw Manhattan again in July and August 2009 off Montauk, just about where we saw her this time.

While we had to go further on this trip we were rewarded with a beautiful pair of humpbacks, synchronized swimming and diving and many tail throws to the calf. These were only surpassed by their close approach to the Viking Star on several occasions. Beautiful to watch. Even though there was another humpback near us we didn’t have time to spend with it. Next Week? 


Totals:
3 Humpback Whales
6 Cory’s Shearwaters
1 Parasitic Jaeger
24 Wilson’s Storm Petrels
3 Red-Necked Phalaropes
2 Black terns
2 Northern Gannets

Bird counts by John Gluth
PHOTOS


 

 

 


 
2016 CRESLI-Viking Whale watch reports

Sunday August 28, 2016

Breaching Whales & Dolphins! Oh, & Sea Turtles too

We found our first whale - a young humpback very shortly after we passed Montauk Point. A few inshore bottlenose dolphins joined this young humpback. We eventually headed further out and found a minke whale. We headed back closser to shore and found a green sea turtle on the way. Then near our first whale area we found more. Another two humpbacks. One was a subadult, the other a juvenile. The last humpback was breaching, flipper slapping, than slapping for nearly 40 minutes - a wonderful show and a nice way to end the trip.

Totals:
3 HUMPBACK WHALES
1 MINKE WHALE
6 INSHORE BOTTLENOSE DOLPHINS
1 GREEN SEA TURTLE
1 UNKNOWN TURTLE 
3 WILSON'S STORM PETRELS
2 CORY'S SHEARWATERS
1 GREAT SHEARWATER

Photos

Sunday August 21, 2016

Long trip but no whales. We headed out and covered over 50 nautical miles but had no luck finding whales or dolphins. Even the balls of krill near Montauk Point had nothing feeding on them. We will try again next week.

Totals:
46 WILSON'S STORM PETRELS
3 CORY'S SHEARWATERS
1 GREAT SHEARWATERS
7 RED NECKED PHALAROPES
5 OTHER PHALAROPES

Sunday August 14, 2016


It was a long hot trip, cooler than on land, but hot none the less! We covered over 52 miles, searching inshore and several offshore feeding areas looking for the whales that had been reported 2 days ago in our usual spots. No luck. No whales, no dolphins, no turtles, a few birds and a few sharks.

Totals:
5 WILSON'S STORM PETRELS
2 CORY'S SHEARWATERS
25 GREAT SHEARWATERS
2 BLUE SHARKS

Sunday August 7, 2016

Everywhere we went we found whales!

3 Humpbacks, 2 Fin Whales, 1 Minke.
The humpbacks were close in, near the shore, one on the way out and two on the way in. We also found a new mother/calf fin whale out where we had seen them before. Not may whales, but a nice variety of species.

Totals:
2 FIN WHALES
1 MINKE WHALES
3 HUMPBACK WHALES 
1 LOGGERHEAD TURTLE
25 YOUNG THRESHER SHARKS
50 WILSON'S STORM PETRELS
100 CORY'S SHEARWATERS
350 GREAT SHEARWATERS
5 SOOTY SHEARWATERS


Photos

Sunday July 31, 2016

Utterly Spectacular day again!

We could hear a young child at the bow say "this was the most spectular day of my life". It was a trip to remember. Not just the 12 fin whales, 2 minkes and 40 common dolphins, but one of the 3 cow/calf fin whale pairs put on an amazing "show". They lunge fed and rolled over onto their sides, or upside down over and over again for about 30 minutes. Something that our seasoned (almost 30 years) naturalist (Dr. Artie Kopelman) had never seen before. Wow! Wait! As I write we found a humpback! This is a new humpback for us this year (our 2nd), it is another from the NYC catalog of Gotham Whale, NYC0031, but hasn't made it to the western NY Bight yet this year. What an amazing, spectacular, outrageously productive day.

Totals:
12 FIN WHALES
2 MINKE WHALES
1 HUMPBACK (NYC0031)
40 SHORT-BEAKED COMMON DOLPHINS 
35 WILSON'S STORM PETRELS
15 COREY'S SHEARWATERS
3 GREAT SHEARWATERS
2 SOOTY SHEARWATERS
1 NORTHERN GANNET

PHOTOS
VIDEO

Sunday July 24, 2016

Another Multispecies Day! Humpback & Fin Whales

We started the trip with reports of a humpback near the lighthouse. We found it, a young humpback that had been seen and photographed by Dr. Artie Kopelman in NY Harbor in late June (Gotham Whale Catalog #NYC0040). Later we headed to where we'd seen fin whales previously this year. This time we found them a little closer in. Again mom and calf pairs (2 Pairs) and seven other fin whales. On our way back we found the humpback once more near the lighthouse. As we left it breached behind us.

Totals:
1 HUMPBACK WHALE (NYC0040)
11 FINBACK WHALES
20 CORY'S SHEARWATERS
10 WILSON'S STORM PETRELS 
5 GREAT SHEARWATERS
1 OCEAN SUNFISH

PHOTO SLIDESHOW
Video

Sunday July 17, 2016

Another Banner Day! Whales & Dolphins

We started in fog, but had reports of whales and knew (hoped?) the fog would lift. The fog lifted and whales were found. 8 fin whales were photographed along with a quick view of a minke. The whales were spread over a 2 mile radius. 4 mom/calf pairs of fin whales were great to see. On our way back 120 common dolphins.

Totals:
8 FIN WHALES
1 MINKE WHALE 
120 SHORT-BEAKED COMMON DOLPHINS
12 CORY'S SHEARWATERS
14 WILSON'S STORM PETRELS 
1 MANX SHEARWATER 
2 BLUE SHARKS

PHOTOS
MOBILE APP WITH PHOTOS

Sunday July 10, 2016

SPECTACULAR TRIP!! 2 species of whales and 2 species of dolphins

Today's trip couldn't have been better! We found a leatherback and bottlenose dolphins (60) shortly after passing Montauk Light. Before 11:30am we found our fin whales. We spent time with 5 fin whales (1 singleton & 2 mother/calf pairs). There were 2 minkes and 3 other fin whales in the area. Great views of 5 fin whales were had. As we headed home, we found an aggregation of 120 short-beaked common dolphins. They swam to us and around us, rode our bow, vocalized and gave us a great chance to watch them. Also, tons of birds. 

Totals:
8 Fin whales
2 Minke whales
60 Inshore bottlenose dolphins 
120 Short-beaked common dolphins
 
3 Manx Shearwaters
6 Great Shearwaters 
13 Cory's Shearwaters
177 Wilson's Storm Petrels 
1 Sooty shearwater
1 Leatherback Turtle 
11 Short billed dowitchers

Bird counts thanks to Frank Stetler and John Gluth 

PHOTOS
MOBILE APP WITH PHOTOS

Sunday July 3, 2016

Beautiful day on the water!

It was a beautiful day on the water with some birds, a loggerhead turtle, but no whales or dolphins.

Totals:
8 Manx Shearwaters
2 Great Shearwaters 
10 Cory's Shearwaters
20 Wilson's Storm Petrels 
1 Loggerhead Turtle 
1 Ocean Sunfish

 

 
2015 CRESLI-Viking Whale watch reports



 

Sunday July 5, 2015

Whales, Sharks, Portuguese Man-of-Wars and Ocean Sunfish!

What a great way to start the 2015 season. We found an amazingly cooperative young fin whale, who provided great views and photographs while it logged near the surface. A few miles awaywe found a large fin whale (over 70 feet long). This whale was feeding near the bottom and would provide us with great views as it surfaced and rolled to close its mouth. It was a fin whale with distinctive propeller scars and was seen by us last year. We also saw a variety of pelagic birds today including Wilson's Storm Petrels, Great Shearwaters, Cory's Shearwaters, Manx Shearwaters and some sort of phalaropes and a gannet. We saw two hammerhead sharks and one ocean sunfish as well.

Totals:

2 Fin Whales
2 Hammerhead Sharks
1 Ocean Sunfish
40 Wilson's Storm Petrels
20 Phalaropes (unindentified)
10 Great Shearwaters, 
10 Cory's Shearwaters
2 Manx Shearwaters
1 Northern Gannet
Photos
Interactive Map with Photos

 Sunday July 12, 2015

A Motherload of Fin Whales

An hour and a half after leaving the dock, we found our first of 10 fin whales! The whales were spread out over a 3 nautical mile diameter area. Both single individuals and pairs. Some of the whales were feeding near the surface, others were feeding on the prey at the sea floor. It was an amazing day that included at least one whale that had been seen last in 2009.  

Totals:

10 Fin Whales
200 Cory's Shearwaters
100 Great Shearwaters
1 Manx Shearwater
10 Wilson's Storm Petrels

Photos
Interactive Map with Photos

Sunday, July 19, 2015

Whales & Dolphins!

It took a while to get out of the fog - several hours in fact, but we did and we found an aggregation of about 100-120 short-beaked common dolphins and 1 fin whale shortly thereafter. We had headed east to where whales and dolphins had been seen yesterday - 24 miles from the Point, but the fog was everywhere. Eventually, we headed back towards where we had seen whales last week. When we got there, the fog lifted and we found them. The dolphins included many young ones and some newly born. The 60 foot long fin whale was a new one for this year. A long but great trip!

Totals: 

100-120 Common Dolphins 
1 Fin Whale
10 Wilson's Storm Petrels 
45 Cory's Shearwaters 
5 Great Shearwaters
20 Common Terns
20 Forster's Terns
1 Roseatte Tern (near jetty)

Photos
Interactive Map with Photos
Video

Sunday July 26, 2015

OH MY! What an AMAZING day! surrounded by whales and dolphins for 4 hours!

It was a spectacular day. Our first whales were just 9 miles from Montauk Point! These were the first of 18 whales- we found 16 fin whales and 2 minke whales and about 60 common dolphins in a 4 mile diameter. There were lots of mother/ calf pairs of fin whales, some trios as well. Sadly, two of the whales had propeller scars. We also found a loggerhead sea turtle on our way back in. It doesn't get much better than this!!

Totals:
16 fin whales
2 minke whales 
60 short- beaked common dolphins
75 Wilson's storm petrels
12 great shearwaters
50 cory's shearwaters
2 phalaropes (unknown species)
1 loggerhead sea turtle

Photos
Interactive Map with Photos

Dolphin Video

Fin Whale Video

Sunday, August 2, 2015

 

We found them again! Whales and Dolphins!

What a perfect day to look for whales- perfect visibility and clean crisp skies! We found our first whale about 1 and a half hours after leaving the dock. It was a small fin whale logging at the surface. Shortly after we found our first of 2 pairs of fin whales. The whales spent a long time down, but gave us great views when they came back up. While checking on the whales, a group of common dolphins followed us for a while. A seventh fin whale blew in the distant, but we couldn't find it. 

Totals:

7 Fin whales
1 Minke whale 
20 Short-beaked common dolphins 
30 Great shearwaters 
20 Cory's shearwaters|
50 Wilson's storm petrels


Photos

Interactive Map with Photos

Video
 

Sunday August 9, 2015

WILD RIDE WITH A WHALE!


It was a wild ride, but we found a fin whale. It was a small one, about 45-50 long and we were able to spend an hour and a half with it. We all got good views of the whale, even though it was spending 10 minutes on a dive. A wild ride, but well worth it. 

Totals:
1 Fin whale
50 Great shearwaters
10 Cory's shearwaters
50 Wilson's storm petrels


Photos
Interactive Map with photos

Sunday August 16, 2015

Found Whales Again!

It took about an hour longer than usual, but we found a 50-60' fin whale. We stayed with it for over an hour as it moved, dove, surfaced, blew, fed and pooped. We got beautiful views of the whale from both sides before we left.

Totals:

1 Fin Whale
15 Great Shearwaters
5 Cory's Shearwaters
15 Wilson's Storm Petrels
12 Phalaropes (unknown species)

Photos
Interactive map with photos

Sunday, August 23, 2015

HOLY S***, BOTTLENOSE DOLPHINS & RIGHT WHALES!

If ever there was a HOLY S*** day on the Viking Fleet/CRESLI whale watch, today was it. Epic, historic and amazing. We began with 100 inshore bottlenose dolphins near the lighthouse, and ended with 2 North Atlantic Right Whales within 5 miles of the point. In nearly 20 years, we've never had right whales on one of our trips. This was special. We had to stay at least 500 yards away at all times, be we got great views and pictures! 

The North Atlantic Right Whales have been identified as follows:
The whale with the small linear scar across the head is #2681, male, born in 1996. The other whale (with the small scar at the top of the right lip) is #2340, male, first sighted in 1993



Totals 
100 Inshore Bottlenose Dolphins
2 North Atlantic Right Whales (NARWC #2340 and #2681)
50 Wilson's Storms Petrels
25 Cory's Shearwaters
10 Great Shearwaters
1 Northern Gannet

Photos
Interactive map with photos

Sunday Aug 30, 2015

We did it again! This time a young humpback whale. Our first of 2015!

It took longer than usual and a different search pattern, but we found a whale. This was a young humpback that surprised us by breaching right in front of us when we were a 1/2 mile away. It breached a few more times before settling down. It was logging and feeding and would fluke occasionally. 

Totals
1 Humpback Whale - young, perhaps a calf
4 Northern Gannets
1 Cory's Shearwater
5 Red Necked Phalaropes

Photos

Interactive Map with Photos

Sunday Sept 6, 2015

Dolphins, Humpback whales and more!

We are proud to say we've had 100% success for our 2015 Whale Watching season!

Our season ended like it began with whales and dolphins! We started out with 100 inshore bottlenose dolphins and we stayed with them for an hour and got some great views. Then off we went to find more- we found a leatherback turtle, then we headed back towards the lighthouse and we found 2 humpback whales! WOW! Thank you to all the great customers and amazing crew from Cresli and the Viking Fleet! We had an AMAZING season!

Totals:
-100 Bottlenose dolphins
-2 Humpback whales
-1 Leatherback turtle
-10 Great shearwaters
-5 Cory's shearwaters
-5 Phalaropes 
-1 Northern gannet

Photos
Interactive Map with Photos

Sunday June 29, 2014: The whales are here!

Fin whales, humpback whales and dolphins! What a way to start the season!

We started with a sad sight of a dead leatherback turtle (Dermochelys coriacea) and hundreds of Wilson's storm petrels (Oceanites oceanicus) feeding on the decaying carcass. It was shortly thereafter that we saw our first group of 20 short-beaked common dolphins (Delphinus delphis) as we headed towards where we were hearing reports of whales. Soon we saw another group of about 30 common dolphins, then a large group of about 120 of them. WOW!

Later we saw our first whale blows. Two fin whales kept us busy for quite some time. Our third fin whale showed up as we were trying to leave. Eventually we had to leave, but on the way back we passed two more fin whales and one humpback whale. They were two far away to head towards, but were seen none the less.

Here are the totals for our first trip of the 2014 season:
5 Fin whales (Balaenoptera physalus)
1 Humpback (Megaptera novaeangliae)
170 Short beaked common dolphins (Delphinus delphis)
300 Wilson's storm petrels (Oceanites oceanicus)
200 Great shearwaters (Puffinus gravis)
20 Cory's shearwaters (Calonectris diomedia)
1 Sooty shearwater (Puffinus griseus)

Photos


Sunday July 06, 2014: We found them again!

Fin whales, Minke whales and offshore bottlenose dolphins!

It was another amazing trip and a continuation of our phenomenal 100% sighting success since last year! We found "the mother load" of whales about 18 nautical miles from the point. Our first whale was a beautiful minke whale, followed shortly thereafter by a mother/calf pair of fin whales. While observing these, we saw blows all around us- perhaps a total of 12 fin whales. We spent time with the pair, then headed to another fin whale followed the pair to form a trio. We then spent time with another cow/calf pair for a bit. During our movements to observe the whales, we were surprised by a pod of offshore bottlenose dolphins (20). They rode our bow, took off and returned time and again to the delight of everyone on board.

Totals:
12 Fin Whales
20 offshore Bottlenose dolphins
50 Wilson's Storm Petels
40 Great Shearwaters
5 Corey's Shearwaters
1 Sooty Shearwater
100+ Common terns

Photos

Interactive Map with Photos

Video


Sunday July 13, 2014: We found them yet again!

Fin whales, Minke Whales, Common dolphins, and more

We were only 8 miles off Montauk Point when Captain Carl spotted the first whale, a lone fin whale traveling SW. We followed it for a while and it proved to be a great introduction to a day of whales and dolphins.

Shortly afterward a pod of 20 short-beaked common dolphins streaked over to our vessel and spent some time bow riding and “porpoising ” alongside the Starship, to the delight of the passengers. The children aboard especially liked seeing the mothers and babies as the pod visited us several times over the course of a half hour.  We continued SE, seeing shearwaters and storm petrels, and stopped to watch the antics of a 4 foot long ocean sunfish alongside the boat.

As we made a long turn back to Montauk we found several other whales actively feeding. The three fin whales included a cow/calf pair and we stopped and observed them for some time. A smaller minke whale was also diving to feed on the scattered pockets of small fish below us. Another (or some of the earlier?) pod of common dolphins joined us too and there was a lot of action around the boat. Sadly our time was up and we headed back to Montauk to disembark a happy group of whale watchers.

Totals
4 Fin Whales
1 Minke Whale
1 Ocean Sunfish
30 Common Dolphins
3 Cory Shearwaters
3 Greater Shearwaters
20 Wilson Storm Petrels

Photos

Interactive map with photos


Sunday July 20, 2014:  EPIC TRIP on the Viking Starship!!

Fin whales, minke whales, bottlenose dolphins & ocean sunfish!

The day started with about 150 bottlenose dolphins just outside jetty and over towards Shagwong. We went offshore to find whales where they had been reported. Our first whales were mother/calf pair of fin whales, then a minke, then we started seeing blows everywhere! There were whales in every direction. We eventually were able to get up and photograph 15 fin whales including 4 calf's with their moms. 2 minke whales, and we also saw an ocean sunfish just before the rain got heavy. What an AMAZING trip!

Totals
15 Fin whales (with many others in the area)
2 Minke whales
150 Inshore bottlenose dolphins
1 Ocean sunfish
100 Wilson's storm petrels
15 Cory's Shearwaters
1 Great Shearwater
Photos
Interactive Map with Photos


Wednesday July 30, 2014:  Still at 100%

Bottlenose Dolphins, Loggerhead, Leatherbacks, Ocean Sunfish & More!

Our 100% Success at finding cetaceans continues. We found inshore bottlenose dolphins shortly after passing the Lighthouse. A group of 10, tthat joined with joined with 20 others. The group included lots of young dolphins swimming with their moms. We headed out further and found a young loggerhead sea turtle, Later we found flying fish, a hammerhead shark,  a Mola mola (Ocean Sunfish), and a small leatherback passed by us. We found no baleen whales, but had a good trip none the less.  WOW! We found another leatherback near the lighthouse and got great views of it feeding on jellyfish.

Totals
30 Inshore bottlenose dolphins
2 Leatherback turtles
1 Loggerhead sea turtle
1 Hammerhead shark
1 Ocean Sunfish
120 Wilson's storms petrels
50 Greater Shearwaters
10 Corey's Shearwaters!

Photos
Interactive Map with Photos


Sunday August 3, 2014:  Still at 100%

Humpback whale!

We decide to head west and then south towards some reported sightings. On our way west, we saw a few blows off about 2 miles away. As we turned toward the whale, we saw it do a full body breach - a beautiful sight! We stayed with that whale for some time. It was busy feeding at the bottom, with 5-7 minute down times. It fluked just a few times, but gave us some nice views anyway. After a while we decided to move on search for others. The ride was fun, kids were having a ball on the rolls and dips. All was fine, until the rain, which kept getting stronger as we searched. No more whales, but lots of happy and wet passengers. 

Totals:
1 Humpback whale
40 Wilson's storm petrels
12 Cory's shearwaters
2 Great shearwaters
1 shark (unknown species)

Photos
Interactive Map with Photos


Wednesday August 6, 2014:  We did it again! Whales!!

Minke and fin whales

Our 100% Success at finding cetaceans continues. We started the day finding a very elusive minke whale- a real 'Stinky' minke that dove and disappeared as we approached. We continued to search and were rewarded by finding a large fin whale south & east of Block Island. This whale provided us with great opportunities to see both right & left side, as well as its head.The 70 foot female fin whale was one we saw last year with a calf. This year she is was back again.

Totals
1 Minke Whale
1 Fin Whale
30 Wilson's Storm Petrels
7 Cory's Shearwaters
6 Red-necked Phalaropes

Photos
Interactive Map with Photos


Sunday August 10, 2014:  Yes!!! fin whales!!!

3 new fin whales

We headed east towards where we had seen whales on Wednesday and where colleagues had seen whales yesterday. As we headed a little over half way there we saw our first blows. A small fin whale was ahead of us- then a larger fin whale blow behind us! This was a mother/ calf pair. They eventually joined each other and surfaced near us when a third fin whale joined the pair. The 3 whales stayed together briefly then seperated. We were able to spend time with each of the 3 whales. As we headed back we encountered a hammerhead shark that gave us great views. It had a hook in its mouth, either it had been caught and released or broke free. In any event, it seemed to be doing okay. 

Totals:

3 Fin Whales
1 Hammerhead shark
1 Ocean Sunfish
10 Wilson's Storm Petrels
50 Cory's Shearwaters

Photos
Interactive Map with Photos


Sunday August 17, 2014:    Another Spectacular Day!

Fin whales, Minke whales, Leatherback sea turtles and Common dolphins.

We started in fog but it cleared as we approached Montauk Lighthouse. We headed east towards where whales had been spotted yesterday. On the way we found 2 groups of common dolphins, one with 10 individuals, the other with 15. We also found three leatherback turtles on the way to the whales. We found two fin whales SE of Block Island. One of the two had propeller scars and had been seen by us 10 days prior, while the other had been seen by us last year just 12 miles SW of Montauk. These whales provided us with great looks & data. We eventually left them to see a massive aggregation of about 120 common dolphins.

Totals 
2 Fin Whales
2 Minke Whales
145 Common Dolphins
3 Leatherback Sea Turtles
5 Wilson Storm Petrels
3 Cory's Shearwaters
1 Manx Shearwater
 

Photos
Interactive Map with Photos


Wednesday August 20, 2014:    Whales and dolphins!!!

8 Fin Whales, 2 Minke Whales, 20 Common Dolphins!

Today we had reports of fin whales far to the east and others closer to the west and south. We headed south and found a group of about 10 short-beaked common dolphins just after 11am. We stayed with them for a while and left in search of larger cetaceans. It took a few more hours but we eventually found the fin whales- first one, then a pair, then more and more until we encountered 8 fin whales and 1 minke whale. There was lots of food in the waters, hence the whales were busy feeding, as were a group of about 10-12 common dolphins. A long day, but successful! We are still at 100% success!

Totals:

8 fin whales
2 minke whales
20 short-beaked common dolphins 
1 unidentified sea turtle
80 Cory's shearwaters
5 Great shearwaters
1 Parasitic jaeger
2 Wilson's storm petrels. 


Photos
Interactive Map with Photos


Sunday August 24, 2014:    What an amazing trip!

12 Fin Whales and 3 Minke Whales

It took a while to get to the whale grounds, but it was well worth the wait! Fin whales and minkes were everywhere. We saw individual fin whales, pairs and trios all feeding (along with minkes) on massive quantities of prey. The fin whales were very active, engaged in surface lunges, rolling over and circle feeding. At points, we were surrounded by whales. As we headed home, we encountered one more pair of fin whales. One of the pair dove and lifted its fluke- a behavior rarely seen and we were lucky enough to see and photograph it!

Totals:

12 Fin Whales
3 Minke Whales
20 Cory's shearwaters
3 Great shearwaters
5 Wilson's storm petrels 


Photos
Interactive Map with Photos


Wednesday August 27, 2014: A HUGE sucess

3 Fin Whales

We departed Montauk and travelled 20 miles offshore. Immediately about 2000 feet off the lighthouse we spotted juvenile false albacore tuna leaping on bait. 

Once we got further offshore, into the remnants of the warm-core eddies of the Gulf Stream, it didn't take long to see our first blow. As we got closer we found two massive adult Finback Whales and one juvenile. We rode along side as they moved east for a good 30 minutes observing what looked like two animals that were as long as the Starship itself!! The whales were lit up in the blue water and the picture opportunity was just outstanding.

On the ride home we briefly saw a Mola mola and some more bird life

Total
3 fin whales
10 Cory's shearwaters
14 Great shearwaters
6 Wilson's Storm Petrels
Mola mola, 
several flying fish



Monday September 1, 2014

Our 2014 Whale watching season ended today. We were unable to find any whales or dolphins today for the first time in 30 consecutive local trips since July 29, 2012. Ah well. This season, like the last, was spectacular. Our local trips brought us in contact wth fin whales, minke whales, humpback whales, short-beaked common dolphins, bottlenose dolphins (inshore and offshore types), leatherback turtles, loggerhead turtles, and Kemp's ridley turtles. 


Totals
1 Great shearwater
6 Wilson's Storm Petrels



 2013 CRESLI-Viking Whale watch reports

Map of 2013 sightings with representative photos and videos

 

Sunday July 7, 2013

It's an ALL-STAR season opener!

A spectacular line-up: whales, dolphins, turtles and pelagic birds. Our day started off with a spectacular view of nearly 1000 common dolphins. The large super- aggregation was spotted at 11am. We stayed with them for quite some time, then headed on. We next encountered loggerhead turtles (2) and eventually turned back from 24 miles out. We found 2 large fin whales feeding fast south of where the dolphins had been. We were able to get great views of the two and saw another about 1/2 mile away. What a great way to start! We will have tons of photos for you on Monday!

Totals:
1000 Common Dolphins 
3 Fin Whales
2 Loggerhead Turtles
500 Great Shearwaters
85 Sooty Shearwaters
30 Cory's Shearwaters
2 Pomarine Jaegers
1 Unidentified Jaeger
1 Manx Shearwater
2 Wilson's Storm Petrels


Photos

Interactive Map with Photos

Video

Sunday July 14th 2013,

Amazing Trip Once Again!

Fin whales, dolphins, loggerhead turtles, pelagic birds!

Our second trip was another winner. We cleared through the fog and found what we were looking for just where we thought they would be. 8-10 fin whales, including 3 mother/calf pairs were feeding and resting, feeding again, same surface and right next to us with their mouths full of food and water, and their throats expanded. We also found 60 dolphins and 2 loggerheads with the whales. Birders on board were also happy to see hundreds of Cory's and Greater Shearwaters, about 25 Sooty Shearwaters and 5 Storm Petrels. So come on out with us next week!


Totals:
8-10 Fin Whales
60 Dolphins
2 Loggerhead Turtles
500 Great Shearwaters
200 Cory's Shearwaters
50 Sooty Shearwaters
12 Storm Petrels
5 Portuguese Man-of-War 


Photos
Interactive Map with Photos
Video

Sunday July 21, 2013

EPIC TRIP!

It was an utterly amazing trip! The BEST IN 13 YEARS!

Fin whales, humpback whales, minke whales and common dolphins galore. We sae our first dolphins only about 7 miles out and our first whales 9 miles out. It started with common dolphins and then 2 humpbacks, then we hit the motherload. Fin whales, humpbacks, minkes and dolphins EVERYWHERE WE TURNED! Bubble feeding humpbackslunge feeding fin whales, humpbacks doing breeches, tail slaps, flipper slap. Rolling fin whales, jumping dolphins, even saw some flying fish and mahi mahi. The bird life was also spectacular and everyone was happy!

Totals:
25 Fin Whales
12 Humpback Whales
2 Minke Whales
600 Common Dolphins
1700 Wilson's Storm Petrels
90 Cory's Shearwaters
26 Sooty Shearwaters
18 Great Shearwaters
5 Manx Shearwaters
5 Brown Pelicans

Photos

Fin whale Video 1
Fin whale Video 2
Humback, Fin whale and dolphin Video

Interactive map with photos

Sunday July 28, 2013

Whales and Dolphins- AGAIN!

Our amazing year continues! Whales, dolphins and pelagic birds were found again. We left in the fog and when it cleared we had perfect conditions. We found our first fin whale- east of where we had seen them previously. This one was not cooperative and kept staying down for anywhere from 3-12 minutes. Our second fin whale was much larger and also spent long times down. While looking at the second whale we found another super aggregation of common dolphins- easily 300 of them-could be seen chasing after prey and coming over to us also. We spent quite a while with the dolphins and found loads of pelagic birds. There were also 1200 Wilson's storm Petrels.

Totals:
2 Fin Whales
300 Common Dolphins
1200 Wilson's Storm Petrels 
30 Cory's Shearwaters
15 Great Shearwaters
3 Sooty Shearwaters 
1 Sea Turtle (unidentitied)
1 Ocean Sunfish
1 Swordfish

Photos
Interactive Map with Photos
Videos

Sunday August 4, 2013

Our success continues!

WHALES, DOLPHINS, TURTLES, AND PELAGIC BIRDS

2013 continues to be a stellar year with an amazing 100% success rate. Today we found a leatherback while on our way to whale grounds and then began to see whales. Today was a humpback day- seeing 3 different humpbacks spread out over several miles. They were staying down for long periods but gave us good views when back up. While viewing the whales we encountered a small group of common dolphins (about 20), On our way back we once again found a super aggregation of about 600 dolphins- all around us for 1/2 mile then another hundred and another humpback, as well as one more leatherback.

Totals:
4 Humpbacks
720 Common Dolphins
2 Leatherback Sea Turtles
1 Blue Marlin
150 Cory's Shearwaters
55 Great Shearwaters
1 Sooty Shearwater
200 Wilson's Storm Petrels
 

Photos
Interactive Map with Photos
Video

Sunday August 11, 2013

INCREDIBLE TRIP AGAIN: Whales, Dolphins, & Turtles

The amazing 2013 season continues. Today we were treated to many groups of dolphins and whales. We started out with several leatherbacks, then fin whales, then multiple dolphin groups. We were often surrounded by the dolphins, they were feeding, as were the fin whales. On our way in we found hundreds more dolphins and two more fin whales all feeding together with hundreds of shearwaters. Another amazing day on the Viking Starship!

Totals:
6 Fin Whales
550 Dolphins
5 Leatherback Turtles
1 Loggerhead Turtle
150 Cory's Shearwaters
150 Great Shearwaters
7 Sooty Shearwaters
Photos
Interactive Map with Photos

Sunday Aug 18, 2013

DOLPHINS and TURTLES

Our success continues, still at 100% cetacean sighting success. Today's trip took us eastward and led us to a leatherback turtle before finding a pod of 20 common dolphins including some very young ones. We found another large group about 30 minutes later. This second group was an aggregation of about 100 individuals. They were very active with even more young ones. 

Totals:
120 Common Dolphins
1 Leatherback Turtle
75 Cory's Shearwaters
15 Great Shearwaters
2 Sooty Shearwaters 
1 Immature Northern Gannet
PHOTOS
Interactive MAP with photoS

Sunday Aug 25, 2013

DOLPHINS!

We took awhile to find them, but we did, about 100 short-beaked common dolphins. This large aggregation broke up into smaller groups and periodically would return. Amidst the smaller groups we found many dolphins involved in courtship and attempted mating. Single females being chases by 5-7 males at a time. We also saw quite a few young swimming with moms, and loads of juveniles.

Totals:
100 Short Beaked Common Dolphins 
25 Great Shearwaters 
35 Cory's Shearwaters
2 Red Necked Phalaropes 
5 Wilson's Storm Petrels
1 Leatherback Turtle (dead)
Photos
Interactive Map with Photos

Sunday September 1, 2013

Humpback Whale!

It wasn't until we were on our way back that we saw it, a tail throwing young humpback. Over and over again this whale would throw its tail producing massive splashes. We were able to see it well, as it splashed, surfaced, dove and tail breached. An excellent finish to our 2013 season. Our first 100% successful season in the 17 years of CRESLI-Viking Fleet whale watches. Next year let's hope we can do it again!See you next season!

Totals:
1 Humpback Whale
10 Cory's Shearwaters
1 Greater Shearwater
3 Norther Gannets (mature)
Photos
Interactive Map with Photos
Videos soon

 

Report your sightings to CRESLI

  You can be of invaluable assistance to CRESLI's Cetacean research program by letting us know of any whales or dolphins you saw while on the water. You can call CRESLI at (631) 319-6003 to report your sighting, or you can and print and complete the form submit it electronically or mail it to CRESLI, PO Box 54, West Sayville, NY 11796.Thank you.

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